Sarah Plummer Lemmon & Matt Hall
Water Interface Experimentation (WIE)
Lyle Ruterbories, Glacier National Park Ranger
2014 California State Fair
Test & Tune
Abstract: Western Recreation
Abstract: Washougal Motocross

BRIEF NO. 58

Wilderness
Project
Wilderness Print
Location
United States
Subject
YJ Store
Wilderness
Words by Kyle von Hoetzendorff

THIS IS A PRINT TO CELEBRATE AND CONGRATULATE WILDERNESS. Congratulations Wilderness. Congratulations Wilderness for being just what you are, not that you need our gratitude. You would be better off without us anyway, the conscious, self-righteous/self-loathing, needy us. You would even be better off without the fawning, in awe, perpetually blissed-out us, the enlightened us, the elevated us. You would just be better off without us, without our tents, our non-motorized vehicles, our horses, our campfire rings, and our buried feces, you would still be you, an even better, cleaner, you, you would be Wilderness just as you were meant to be, absent the blight of consciousness, the acne of sentience.

BRIEF NO. 57

Mike Cherney on Black Bears
Project
Wildlife
Location
Mythical State of Jefferson
Subject
Ursus americanus
Mike Cherney on Black Bears
Words by Mike Cherney, photography by Daniel Wakefield Pasley

THERE’S THIS SWEET GRAVEL LOOP CALLED MDK which I ride a bunch ‘cause it just has everything and it’s right out the door to catch a quick blast of endorphins. Approaching the summit of the first climb I’m motivated… one with the effort and dialed for the upcoming descent that’ll drop me into Goods Gulch and the climb out over Shoefly. Rolling over the top, shifting into the large gears, gaining speed, tucked and floating on the bike over the uneven terrain, totally in the flow and the moment. Then, wham, out of the brush on my left comes this black bear (Ursus americanus), 10 feet in front of me and already up to speed running breakneck in the same direction I’m going.

 

For 300 feet it’s me and the bear blasting down the gravel road. I’m hang’n right on it’s ass, holler’n, “Go bear go!” and it’s sending up dust like a beer-blurred motocrosser. As quick as it came onto the road, it dove off into the trees and gulch below. Frigg’n super rush of adrenaline, heart rate pinned and a 110 degree left turn just ahead. Made my day.

BRIEF NO. 56

Rope Swing
Project
Essays
Location
Saco River, ME
Subject
Rope Swings
Rope Swing
Words by Derek Stackhouse, photo (Washougal River) by Daniel Wakefield Pasley

THE SACO RIVER WINDS FROM THE WHITE MOUNTAINS OF NEW HAMPSHIRE through Southern Maine, emptying into the sea at Saco Bay. Behind its bucolic banks, though, lies a grim history, one that elicits whispers of an “Indian curse.” Local legend goes that in the summer of 1675, a group of white settlers tossed an Indian boy from the Sokokis tribe into the river to see if native children were in fact born able to swim “like dogs.” Enraged Sokokis chief Squandro swore that three white men would perish in the river’s waters annually for the deed. The tale is such an integral part of life in the region that in 1947, after a summer of no casualties, the front page of the local newspaper declared “Saco River Outlives Curse of Indian Chief.”

 

Today, on a leisurely inner tube trip down the calm stretch of the Saco between tiny Buxton and Hollis, Maine, one need only scan the shores to see the variety of human uses for such a waterway. The West Buxton Hydroelectric Plant, a mid-century monument to the desire to harness the water’s power, still operates just upriver from sprawling residential lawns and the uniform green of Salmon Falls Country Club. These manicured expanses continually interrupt vibrant green banks of forest. Here, working class families who have farmed the land or moved timber down the river for generations live alongside moneyed retirees and professionals looking for some relaxation. And finally, just across from the golf course’s ninth fairway, stands that ubiquitous totem of adolescent abandon: the rope swing.

BRIEF NO. 55

Slash Piles
Project
Essays
Location
Black Hills, SD
Subject
Slash Piles
Slash Piles
Words by Kyle von Hoetzendorff, photo by Daniel Wakefield Pasley

The term Slash Pile is evocative and ambiguous. Context is important.

 

THE ROCK AND ROLL CONTEXT

 

‘Slash Pile’. It is hard for me to believe this wasn’t a term used by roadies during the Guns N’ Roses Appetite for Destruction world tour. To what specifically it would reference has yet to be determined in an anthology of those times, but I have a few ideas. ‘Slash Pile’ could easily have been a term used by envious roadies when noticing that once again Slash was buried under a bevy of buxom and lascivious groupies. They could have said for example, “Man did you see that Slash Pile last night? How does that dude even breathe in there?” or, “Hey bud what happened to your elbow?” ”I slipped on the wet spot from that Slash Pile this morning and slammed it on a Marshall cabinet.” ‘Slash Pile’ could also have been used as a term of pity, one that plays upon Slash’s voracious alcohol and substance use as in, “Did you see that Slash Pile last night? Poor guy lost his top hat when he tumbled down the stairs of his tour bus.” I am confident that a future tell-all will get to the bottom of this mystery.

BRIEF NO. 54

Nylon
Project
Technical Briefs
Location
Mackenzie River, Northwest Territories, Canada
Subject
Aliphatic polyamides
Nylon

Words by Ryan Liverman, photograph from Arctic Red River Outfitters by Daniel Wakefield Pasley

 

EVERY NOW AND AGAIN I HEAR SOMEONE BRAGGING about how the technology in their newest piece of kit got its start in the space program. Velcro, invisible braces, and solar cells are all fantastic and NASA deserves credit wherever it can get it. Shoot, if astral provenance can reinforce a purchasing decision or dehydrated ice-cream can get another kid interested in science I’m all for it. But it’s worth noting that not all worthwhile inventions have such an auspicious start. For example, I believe the facts will clearly show that nylon has had a dramatic impact on our lives with little to none of the recognition showered on any of the many fancier or more flashy inventions like Velcro which, let’s be fair, is ultimately applied to quite a few pedestrian or mundane tasks, like the securing of diapers for feckless parents.

BRIEF NO. 53

Conversations with a Black Bear
Project
DFKWA
Location
Somewhere near the Chetco River
Subject
The Scott and Yonder Journal Coalition
Conversations with a Black Bear

Oh hello, who is that over that by that huckleberry bush, I didn’t hear you coming!

 

SILLY ME. I’M SUCH A SILLY BEAR. Me with my head in the clouds, halfway through this dead baby deer I tripped over on the way to the river for my morning drink. I’m crepuscular, that means I like to eat in the early morning and late afternoon, when the light is low and faint, needless to say it takes me a while to wake up. But where are my manners?! What kind of carrion do you like the best, hmmm? You look like the small intestines type, am I right? Why don’t you bring some of those delicious berries over here and visit with me for a minute. There’s something I’ve been meaning to talk to you about, and, well, the whole thing makes me a little bit sad.

 

Do you know about capital W Wilderness, have you heard of this? I love it. I like big Wilderness and small Wilderness, old Wilderness and new Wilderness, placid Wilderness and vibrant Wilderness. I mean when it comes down to it, I just can’t get enough of Wilderness, period. I just love it so much. But what about you? I mean you are here, and you do have a fawn’s foot in your mouth and berry juice dribbling down your chin, talking to a silly ole bear! But seriously YJ-guy, how do you feel about Wilderness?

BRIEF NO. 52

US Route 93
Project
YJ Playlists
Location
Eastern Idaho, on the other side of the landslide
Subject
Roadtrip Playlist #1: Goldbug & Kirkham
US Route 93

As compiled, auditioned and vetted by Daniel Wakefield Pasley, Sara Elise Nylin, Ginger Lee Roberts and Trevor Jose Botas over the course of three days—March 14th, 15th and 16th—somewhere, anywhere and everywhere between Portland, Hermiston, Spokane, Coeur d’Alene, Missoula, Salmon, Goldbug, Chalis, Craters of the Moon, Mormon Bend, Lowman, Kirkham, Garden Valley, Boise, Ontario, Baker, La Grande, Pendleton and the Dalles.

 

  1. Django Django – Django Django Hail Bop
  2. WhoMadeWho – Brighter Inside World
  3. Debruit & Alsarah – Jibal Alubna ٥. جبال النوبة
  4. Blood Orange – Cupid Deluxe, You’re Not Good Enough
  5. Dornik – Something About You
  6. Karin Park – Highwire Poetry Restless
  7. Kate Boy – Northern Lights
  8. Disclosure – You & Me (feat. Eliza Doolittle) [Flume Remix]
  9. Shy Girls – Without
  10. Niki & The Dove – The Drummer
  11. Petite Noir – Disappear
  12. Labyrinth Ear – Humble Bones
  13. Mathew Dear – Her Fantasy
  14. Majical Cloudz – Impersonator

BRIEF NO. 51

Turnagain Mud Flats
Project
Yarns
Location
Collective Consciousness
Subject
Mud
Turnagain Mud Flats

Words and Photographs by Jen Kinney

 

THE ROAD SOUTH OF ANCHORAGE IS DRAWN LIKE A BALDE BETWEEN SEA AND MOUNTAIN. We were speeding along it, Don grinning as he gunned it through a rain-slick curve and told me his tale. He wound up in Alaska because a friend had told him fantastic stories: land up here for the taking, squatter’s rights to dream of, a lavish minimum wage. Don and this buddy, who in the time it took them to plan the trip had gone and acquired a family, drove up from Nebraska in a full Winnebago, with Don’s BMW motorcycle hitched to the back. A sharp turn, a slick road, and the bike, his get-a-away, was dashed against a wall of rock and ruined. The stories weren’t true. The promises broke. Stunned at a payphone in Anchorage, Don hung up too proud to dial the numbers and ask the favors that could get him home.

 

He laughed telling me this, decades later, still in the state of his exile. By the time he had saved up enough dough to buy an alarm clock radio and a guitar, he no longer wanted to leave. The night we met I had just touched down in Anchorage, where Don picked me up at the airport and drove me to work as a waitress in his fish and chips restaurant. I hadn’t thought to ask many questions about him or the restaurant or the town, just took the job and flew, so when I arrived that night, the landscape was clean and unburdened by stories. Don’s, spat wryly from the side of his mouth, were the first I heard. Above us, the mountains were flat, thin sheets of paper. At their feet was the narrow, mud-choked inlet of the Turnagain Arm. It was so named in warning, Don told me, by Captain Cook after his expedition discovered they could not sail through it to the ocean. The only hope of escape was to turn back they way they came.

BRIEF NO. 50

Bushwhacking in British Columbia
Project
Mountain Hunting
Location
The Toolies
Subject
Bushwhacking
Bushwhacking in British Columbia
Words and photographs by Daniel Wakefield Pasley

THE FIRST DAY OF MY SUMMER VACATION, IN THE SKEENAS.

 

We are fanned-out and bushwhacking through a square mile or so of riparian bramble—otherwise known as Grizzly Bear Habitat—in an attempt to locate a yellow and blue bundle, the contents of which are an inflatable raft and a foot locker-sized plastic box in which there are many large golden blocks of discount cheese, Crystal Light packets and cardboard cartons of off-brand/generic/discount Power-type bars. The bramble is thick and sharp, the ground is uneven and hummocky, the mosquitos are Hitchcock-thick, it’s 97 degrees fahrenheit. We beat the ground at our feet with our boots, walking sticks, shotgun barrels, rifle butts, hoping for the sound of an inanimate thunk. The gnarliest sections of bush, the sections through which we’re forced to crawl, tunnel, climb, burrow and fist, are dense like a wall. A hairy/tangled/brushy/bushy wall, but a wall all the same. In regards to height, density and penetrability; the thicker sections of bush are more closely related to the object into which the Crash Test Dummies in the Volvo Safety Centre drive, than say for example a trail on which humans walk.

BRIEF NO. 49

Men’s Penury
Project
Essays
Location
Canyon de Chelly, AZ
Subject
Broken Down
Men’s Penury
Words by Richard Ellis, Photograph (Highway 22 headed north to Black Diamond, Alberta) by Daniel Wakefield Pasley

WE WERE ROLLING ALONG JUST FINE TILL WE HIT THAT PLAINTIVE CHORD CHANGE, from F-sharp to G-sharp minor that promises release, but always fails to deliver. Gram Parsons’s reverie of brass buttons and green silks is unsteady in the light of day, It was a dream much too real, to be leaned against too long. That was the moment when that seam of misery, fevered with tragedy in Florida and lullaby-ed away by a pharmaceutical Morpheus in a motel in Joshua Tree, rippled out one more aftershock and brought us to a halt. The lights went out, the engine ran down, the alternator firing to a long gone beat.

BRIEF NO. 48

Bob Dittler et. al.
Project
R&R
Location
The Internet
Subject
Science and Nonduality
Bob Dittler et. al.

Yonder Journal received the following correspondence from Mike Cherney on 16 February, 2014.

 

From: Mike Cherney
Date: Sun, Feb 16, 2014 at 10:39 PM
Subject: more gonzo

 

dudes, this is long and i know your busy. read some a save to read some later. this shit is way out there and right into a very ( i like use this word lots ) interesting space.

 

so i’m sit’n around do’n the r&r thing this evening and being on the safe side my consciousness goes in search of some rare moments in time. i just found a horde of business cards and notes i took over the past few years. in there was one in particular about a dude i know around here who has a common friend with me named Terrance McKenna. Terrance is an authority on psychoactive and hallucinogenic substances, like a science guru type thing and he lived in the same small village as i and his kids played with mine and we sat and talked some about his work, and he died young. so this hooks into Malcom Terrance of that commune fame and into some more individuals i have come to know over the years. one name pops in hard and i get curious, google the dude and ta da, i get my old buddy Bob Dittler who used to give me a ride down to S. F. from Camp Meeker in Sonoma Co where we both lived and partied when i attended the S. F. Art Institute. the last time i saw Bob was at a party he gave after having taken acid for over 30 days straight. he was into human behaviors and the modification there of. anyway, that’s what he called it. that was the day i found that i was to become a father.

BRIEF NO. 47

Bushwhacking in the MSOJ
Project
Essays
Location
Not Applicable
Subject
Bushwhacking
Bushwhacking in the MSOJ

WE ARE TIRE, HUNGRY, AND BEATEN. Around us mountains rise like picket signs to mock our day’s progress. This trip, which trip specifically doesn’t matter, is familiar; you, me, we have all been here before, a day full of motivational derision packed with mind-chiding expletives like “just around the corner”, “this is the last hill,” and “I am sure it’s just right up ahead.” The road we’re on, our road, has petered out, it’s a dead end stub built by the type of people who knew exactly where they came from and who had no choice but to return there. We on the other hand need to carry on, turning back is an admission of failure, an admission that all those involved had seriously considered and yet none of us were smart enough to act upon.

BRIEF NO. 46

Mike Cherney’s Knife
Project
The Mythical State of Jefferson Permanent
Location
Somes Bar, CA
Subject
Everyday Tools
Mike Cherney’s Knife

DURING THE EXTENSIVE AND YEAR-LONG PLANNING, scouting, reconnaissance and beta collection phase of the Mythical State of Jefferson Permanent, Mike Cherney and Yonder communicated weekly if not daily. Phone calls, landline only. No texting. Some handwritten letters. And hundereds of emails. Mike is a photographer, 60’s survivor, jeweler, husband, father, bike rat, homesteader, builder, Toyota pick-up owner and oral historian of the fireside yarn variety. What follows is a particularly poetic excerpt from an unsolicited email about his knife.

 

Some question or interest was raised about my carrying a folding knife while cycling.

 

I don’t usually give this a lot of thought maybe ‘cause I have always had a knife on me of one kind or other.

 

It’s a tool, a pretty simple one, which does many tasks.

 

It makes toothpicks, kindling, wooden pins/pegs, temporary shelters, snares, spoons, forks and walking sticks.

 

It cuts food items, rim tape—used this move once to resolve a friend’s serious tire seating issue in the middle of another Nowhere after his 3rd flat—cardboard, paper, duck tape, handlebar tape. Even whittled copper wire down to size and got a remote water well back up and running.

 

My knife opens boxes, screwed together things, letters, plastic bags, fingers with splinters, cans of food, and old tire tubes to be used as protective sleeves on my bike.

 

It has also been used to field dress small game animals, collect rattles off road kill snakes and harvest fruits and vegetables.

 

I use it and rely on it every day.

BRIEF NO. 45

Hideout, UT
Project
Waypoints—Scenic Overlooks
Location
Jordanelle Reservoir, N State Road 32
Subject
Town Incorporation
Hideout, UT

FED BY THE PROVO RIVER, Jordanelle Reservoir (along with its accompanying state park) was formed in 1995 with the construction of the Jordanelle Dam. Storing enough water for a six-year drought, the reservoir swallowed the towns of Keetley and Hailstone and necessitated the rerouting of US Routes 40 and 189 through nearby mountains. An artificial wetland was also constructed at the foot of the dam in order to help allay the protests of anti-dam conservationists.

BRIEF NO. 44

Hoover Dam
Project
Waypoints—Scenic Overlooks
Location
Black Canyon, Colorado River
Subject
Hoover Dam Overlook
Hoover Dam

DESPITE, AMONG VARIOUS OTHER DIFFICULTIES, BEING THE LARGEST CONCRETE STRUCTURE EVER BUILT AT THE TIME, over one hundred worker deaths, and challenging weather (the average daytime high during the summer of ’31 was 119.9°F), the Hoover Dam was delivered to the federal government by Six Companies, Inc.11A conglomeration of six pre-existing construction outfits, Six Companies was formed purely for the purpose of constructing the dam over two years ahead of schedule. Employing an arch-gravity design, the Hoover Dam’s convex side extends upstream into the reservoir, where the water compresses the dam structure and pushes it into the ground. The entire flow of the Colorado flows through the Hoover turbines (via the iconic penstock towers), producing an average of 4.2TWh per year since 1940 and it sees more than a million tourists annually.

 

In total, deaths associated with the dam construction amounted to 112—though this figure does not include workers who died from “pneumonia22Some allege the infection was used as a coverup for those who actually died of carbon monoxide poisoning from operating vehicles inside of tunnels.“. Of the 112, only 96 are deemed “official” by the Bureau of Reclamation, as deaths like J. G. Tierney, who drowned after falling into the Colorado 20 December 1922 have been deemed to be outside the scope of the construction project. Tierney was the first of the 112 aforementioned deaths; the last died in a fall on 20 December 1935: his son Patrick W. Tierney.

BRIEF NO. 43

Shoe Tree
Project
Waypoints—Scenic Overlooks
Location
[Formerly] Middlegate, NV
Subject
Fallen Monuments
Shoe Tree
Words by Kyle von Hoetzendorff; photograph by Daniel Wakefield Pasley

THERE ARE CERTAIN TREES ALONG THE SIDE OF DESOLATE STRETCHES OF HIGHWAY THAT ARE COVERED IN HANGING SHOES. Deranged Christmas trees festooned with well-trodden ornaments. There is no outstanding motive to account for why one tree would be so adorned while many others remain barren to grow old in with naked dignity. The question of why may have never been explored.

 

Maybe it’s the way the light hits these shoe trees when the sun lays down in the distance, or that they have the familiar canopy of the arboreal archetype—I am thinking Bob Ross cum Window OS stock background bundle. It could be that this tree springs up around the point in the road when anyone too drunk to stay put becomes sober enough to reconsider, say a lonely hustler on a surreptitious escape from the gold-ringed clutches of Reno’s rhinestone and dandruff gangsters.

BRIEF NO. 42

Destruction
Project
Archaeology
Location
Paradox Valley, CO
Subject
Non-repeatable Process
Destruction
Archaeology inevitably is a destructive process. Working with nothing but the waste and ruin of the past, archaeologists are forced to develop multiple scientific methodologies that maximize a partial data set. The importance of scientific rigor is exasperated by the fact that excavation is a one-time act that removes the lion's share of information a site has to yield. Therefore, as a science, it is a carefully thought out process that requires precision, attention to minute detail, and complete respect for the slow process, as it can never be repeated again.”- William Gardner, Ph.D. Archaeology Student, Yale Dept. of Anthropology

BRIEF NO. 41

The Siskiyou Mountain Club
Project
De Facto Kalmiopsis Wilderness Area
Location
NEAR THE ILLINOIS RIVER
Subject
Trailwork
The Siskiyou Mountain Club

A RELATIVELY NEW ORGANIZATION, THE SISKIYOU MOUNTAIN CLUB WAS FOUNDED IN 2009 by local residents Jillian Stokes and Gabe Howe to recruit volunteers to help their trail-clearing efforts. Eventually gaining the support of the USFS and BLM along with a 501(c)(3) designation, the group works on trails throughout BLM land and the Rogue River-Siskyou National Forest. The program also now provides seasonal employment for youth in southwest Oregon in addition to leading recreational hikes for the public.

I do it because the work is gratifying on all sorts of levels. It's exciting for me because of the people involved—and I love all of the rivers, and mountains, and plants, and animals that make this area spectacular—and the relationships I've built, and to help provide experiences to people. When you come out and engage either new staff or volunteer you're doing two things. First, you're directly helping that person come out and enjoy the wilderness, and in this area it's often a place they wouldn't have seen otherwise. Secondly by working on these trails we help provide the next user, and the user after that, a better experience—and one with a smaller impact—in the wilderness.”- Gabe Howe, SMC Executive Director

BRIEF NO. 40

Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park
Project
Waypoints
Location
Outside Kanab, UT
Subject
Coral Pink Sand Dunes
Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park
Photograph by Daniel Wakefield Pasley

COMPRISED OF DUNES THAT MOVE UP TO 50 FEET PER YEAR DUE TO WIND, Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park outside Kanab, UT33Originally settled in 1864, “Little Hollywood” is historically notable as a favorite location of the film industry, especially during the heyday of Hollywood Westerns. was formed by the Venturi Effect. High winds increase in speed as they hit the notch between the Moccasin and Moquith Mountains, picking up particles of the local Navajo Sandstone. As soon as the notch opens up again, wind velocity decreases and the particles are deposited. This is a slow process‚ as one might imagine—the dunes are estimated to be somewhere between 10,000 and 15,000 years old.

 

At just 13.6 square kilometers, CPSDSP is relatively small, but most of the acreage is available for use by off-road recreational vehicles. Notable in “ATV Central” is the “Sand Highway,” a one-way, narrow, winding canyon that is the park’s most popular OHV44Off-Highway Vehicle trail. Park officials do note that “all of the dunes are open for hiking and just playing in the sand, ” though by most accounts the boardwalk is foot travelers’ most common destination.

BRIEF NO. 39

EN 417 – Normes Européennes 417 – The Lindal Valve
Project
Technical Briefs
Location
Shorty Peak Lookout, ID
Subject
Canister Fuel Standardization
EN 417 – Normes Européennes 417 – The Lindal Valve
Words by Ryan Liverman; photograph by Daniel Wakefield Pasley

EN 417 IS THE OFFICIAL ABBREVIATION FOR NORMES EUROPEENNES 417; a European standard for the manufacture of “non-refillable metallic gas cartridges for liquefied petroleum gases, with or without a valve, for use with portable appliances.” What EN 417 does is specify manufacturing guidelines for the small canisters of fuel you take camping. In North America the threaded valve commonly seen on the top of EN417 compliant canisters is often referred to as a “Lindal Valve.” Similar to the near ubiquitous use of the term Allen Key, Lindal Valve is the colloquial, incorrect, and more interesting name for the 7/16” – UNEF threaded valve on your resealable canister of camping fuel.

BRIEF NO. 38

Wolf Satellite
Project
The Mythical State of Jefferson Permanent
Location
Yreka, CA
Subject
Yreka RV Park
Wolf Satellite

BRIEF NO. 37

Itchy and Scratchy
PROJECT
THE MYTHICAL STATE OF JEFFERSON PERMANENT
LOCATION
YREKA, CA
SUBJECT
SECESSION
Itchy and Scratchy

To commemorate The Mythical State of Jefferson Permanent, Yonder Journal commissioned Joshua Porter to illustrate Itchy and Scratchy headed to work. T-shirt available in the YJ Store.

 

IN THE EARLY 1940s, RESIDENTS OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA AND SOUTHERN OREGON had become increasingly frustrated over the lack of attention paid to them—particularly the lack of attention paid to their need for more and better roads—by the governments of their respective states. Given the area’s rich natural resources, residents felt that the lack of infrastructure development was limiting their economic development—and citizens felt they lacked the voice in government, despite being taxpayers, to effect the changes needed. Thus began the State of Jefferson secession movement.

 

After finding support for a plan which would see seven total counties secede from Oregon and California to form a new, 49th, state, the Siskiyou Daily News held a contest, which contest paid two dollars to the winning suggestion for a name—Jefferson. Beginning in November, the area would “secede” weekly, on Thursdays.

Jefferson was to be formed with an overall laissez-faire attitude: few restrictions on economic development and even fewer taxes.”

A state seal was created, literature was forcibly handed out along highways, and the movement garnered national media attention. On December 4th, a parade was held in the middle of Yreka celebrating the inauguration of Judge John C. Childs as Jefferson’s governor. The festivities included two leashed bears, Itchy and Scratchy, leading the parade. And serving in a sense, as mascots.

 

On December 7th, the Imperial Japanese Navy attacked the US naval base at Pearl Harbor, and the secessionist movement lost most of it’s muster. However, it has never truly died out, with a long-lasting general sentiment in the region punctuated by small sparks of activity. Most recently in September of 2013, Siskiyou County supervisors voted to begin seceding once again.

BRIEF NO. 36

Tanoak Dust
Project
De Facto Kalmiopsis Wilderness Area
Location
Near the Illinois River, Kalmiopsis Wilderness, OR
Subject
Wilderness Irritants and Allergies
Tanoak Dust

NOTHOLITHOCARPUS DENSIFLORUS, OR TANOAK, is an evergreen oak that grows in the Western US. Reaching heights of up to 40 meters, the tree is taller than most oaks55Tanoak is not a true oak, hence the compound name. despite its slender stature, typically growing to no more than 18 inches across. Named for the high amounts of tannins in it’s bark, the tree was particularly valuable to the leather industry before synthetic tannins were developed. However it may be most notable for the “dust” it produces: a mixture of pollen and wooly fibers that grow on young leaves notorious in logging circles for it’s effects on the respiratory system (especially when combined with high altitudes and summer temperatures north of 100°F).2 Today, trail crews in southern Oregon (tanoak’s most prominent location) encounter it often.

Some people have a pretty bad reaction to tanoak dust, where they actually find it hard to breathe, in a way kind of like an anaphylactic reaction—I've given people Benadryl for it before. It starts to itch at your throat, and then pretty soon it gets worse, and worse, until you're just hacking globs of dust and saliva conglomerate. I think it's worse than poison oak, and I've had poison oak really bad. Poison oak you can do a lot to prevent—although at a point there's not avoiding it—and you can do a lot to ease the symptoms afterwards. But the dust is just everywhere. There is no way around it.”- Gabe Howe, Siskiyou Mountain Club Executive Director

BRIEF NO. 35

Lake Havasu
Project
Waypoints
Location
Lake Havasu City, AZ
Subject
Spring Break
Lake Havasu
Words by Kyle Von Hoetzendorff, Photo by Emiliano Granado.

ON THE WESTERN EDGE OF ARIZONA LIES A LITTLE WATER RESERVOIR CALLED LAKE HAVASU.

Internationally renowned for its graphic party scene—drawing spring breakers, winter vacationers, and those interested in a little spring fling from the college campuses of North America—this little lake is not just a party spot for thousands of toned, tanned, and buff ASU students. It may have Copper Canyon, a cove where the lugubrious and unchaste cavort, knee deep in the sun flush water of a desert reservoir, drunk on the dry arid light and ice cold Smirnoff Ice, but that’s not all there is to this desert bastion. For the stringent outdoorsman this wet paradise offers plenty of wholesome activities.

Rather than experience the carnal delights of freshly legal co-eds, the sportsman can purchase a jar of fast-oozing Magic Bait Catfish Dough Bait at Bass Tackle Master and hunker down at lakes edge with a cooler of cold cuts while he or she fishes for some of Western Arizona’s finest catfish. For some, pulling one of these prehistoric bottom feeders is all the T&A they need.”

While a floating orgy engages in hedonistic reverie not seen since the unfettered sensuality of Caligula’s court, the history buff can pay a visit to the London Bridge. Bought and moved from the Thames to Havasu in 1962 by Robert P. McCulloch of the oil McCullochs, the London Bridge serves as the necessary connection between McCulloch’s luxurious, planned community and the vast plebeian wasteland of America. The bridge spans a narrow manufactured canal that acts as both a physical and psychological barrier between these two worlds. For a fully immersive experience, visitors can pay a visit to the once lavish and now deteriorated English village built to bolster the clout of this desert bridge. The formerly opulent Tudor homes add a point of uncanny excitement for the sophisticated traveler.

 

Though this lake was built to hold and store water that will be used to nurture and coddle the under appreciated agrarian fields of the Southwest; water that will flow through the faucets and showers of suburban communities, outlying townships, and major metropolitan areas, the local government has yet to check the aggressive exchange of bodily fluids taking place in these precious waters. Is this a nod to Southwesterners’ hearty constitution? Recognition of desert dwellers’ unassailable individuality? Or is it the manifestation of a conflict that so often occurs at the border of culture and belief?

 

Whatever the case the young and the old continue to flock to Lake Havasu, a lake that should not be, and despite this, despite it’s synthetic manifestation, continues to etch lasting memories into the minds of these very real visitors. Memories that will exist long after the lake has gone brackish or dry. Memories of mirth and mayhem; solitude and temperance, discovery and vexation. This is a desert mirage that only exists because of you, make it what you will.

BRIEF NO. 34

Knife Fighting
Project
Tactical
Location
Yreka, CA
Subject
Hand-to-Hand Combat
Knife Fighting
Words by Kyle Von Hoetzendorff; photos by Daniel Wakefield Pasley

WHEN ARMED WITH A SOG NAVY SEAL issue tactical fighting knife it may be easy to allow oneself to consider not only becoming entangled in a knife fight, but also as the half-as-likely victor of said vicious entanglement. Just take a look at that photo. Normally, I am your affable, everyday-havin’-fun kind of Joe, but that doesn’t come through here. What comes through is straight mercenary. There is no doubting the soldier-for-hire vibe that I am putting—strictly killer. I can tell you that when I had that knife in my hand, striking poses, channeling Steven Segal in the final fight scene from Under Siege, when he takes down an Axl Rose-looking terrorist played by Tommy Lee Jones, I was stabbing the air aggressively, taking broad swipes and making quick jabs, draining any and all opponents of their well earned vital fluids. We’re talking ninjas shrouded in black and tank top-sporting French legionnaires, bad dudes in red bandannas wearing wayfarers with a gold cross hanging from one ear, hep cats in berets and turtle necks, gangbangers in wife beaters and dark blue dungarees, the list goes on. And I was casually taking down each one, methodically like someone folding clothes.

After relishing in the champagne-fueled victor’s palace of my mind, I researched knife fighting and learned a few things. The first and most important lesson is that I never, ever, want to be involved in a knife fight.”

BRIEF NO. 33

The Comfort Inn Covenant
Project
Talismans
Location
The Mythical State of Jefferson
Subject
Jon Bailey's Comfort Inn Cup
The Comfort Inn Covenant
Words by Kyle von Hoetzendorff. Photographs by Daniel Wakefield Pasley.

SOME CUPS HOLD THE BODY OF CHRIST and some cups merely celebrate victory, but most pass through our lives necessarily forgettable, the combined result of their ubiquity and efficacy. They serve a purpose; we find refreshment and move on. If we are to believe Steven Spielberg’s famous Dr. Jones, and I don’t see any reason why we wouldn’t, then there are rare times when even the most simple of cups can be invested with unbelievable power. The coveted grail, sought after by the unanimously reviled Nazi’s for its ability to grant eternal life was at one point pursued in real time in real life by medieval crusaders who truly believed that a cup from some blue-eyed bearded dude could grant eternal life. That eternal life was something to be desired, especially in that era, a time that many scientists now believe was a miniature ice age illustrates man’s utter incomprehension of time and death. Eternal life in a world of constant rain, unending cold, inconsolable ignorance and rampant gonorrhea? Forever? The premise of the promise is not enticing.

 

Still the idea that a cup, or any inanimate object, could stand for something larger than itself, bigger than its function, is not foreign or foolish. We are our memories and in our memories objects carry weight and incite action. Talismans and lucky t-shirts, favorite pens, and rabbit’s feet affect the way we respond to the world. These objects gain their emotional dominion uniquely, through no prescribed course. Luck, accretion, surprise, and timing can all inaugurate a new totem into our lives.

 

Jon’s Comfort Inn cup, a last minute filch from our motel's continental breakfast bar, was our totem. That it survived the trip was remarkable in its own right. The wax paper had been crumpled and folded so many times that by the end the trip the cup was stained and sagging but it remained capable of holding our hopes. Jon had faired even better and managed to avoid any and all mishaps for the duration of our adventure. During our most dire moment, when the group was run out on a scree field on the side of a mountain, he alone seemed unfazed. With no apparent route Jon decided to navigate down the mountain by tossing his bike over a sea of 10-foot high buck brush.

 

We stood there watching, witnessing our monument topple, our flag burn, and it appeared as if the power of his cup had reached a point of failure. He appeared to be struggling. Up to this point we wagered our morale on Jon’s indomitable character. Our faith in the titanium fantasy-cum-reality camp mugs, featherweight sleeping bags and collapsible futurist domiciles disintegrated before us. Jon had been powered by something else, something that we didn’t have, a cavalier flippancy that the experienced exude and the novice covet.

 

As he fought the mountain the rest of us went into free fall, dreading every imaginable fucking outcome, slipping into the desperate self-loathing that comes at a time when all seems lost, when it seemed our only option would be to retrace the last three days journey, with negligible rations and zero morale on our now completely blown out and blistered feet. While this thought washed over the group like a black tide Jon and his cup exploded from the green abyss of primitive fauna, took a moment to reconnoiter with Chris “Rally” McNally, and through a form of divination not accessible by the rest of us found a way through savage sharp brush back to open trail.

 

The cup had become a metonym for resilience. It managed to avoid any number of potential annihilation catastrophes that would have lead to its demise. It was protected, sheltered from our pyre and our angst. Jon, with his worn at the edges gear and unfazed exuberance instilled in the rest of us a blind miscalculated confidence that was necessary for the completion of our expedition. The cup carried the fuel that kept Jon spotless, free from misstep or fault. It was their covenant, the cup and Jon’s, and no one dared to break it. We had our own titanium, tin, and plastic mugs that we were happy to sip from, to drink from their meaningless vacuum our hot chocolate and coffee. Jon had his cup, he deserved its power, and as our trip grew longer, harder, and more doubtful, the rest of us found we needed something to believe in.

 

Jon Bailey’s Comfort Inn Cup is the first Talisman available from Yonder Journal.

BRIEF NO. 32

The Wrong/Right Way To Experience Montauk
Project
Tourism
Location
Montauk, NY
Subject
Alt-Tourism
The Wrong/Right Way To Experience Montauk
Words by Greg Rutter. Photograph by Emiliano Granado.

I’M NOT SAYING YOU SHOULD DISLOCATE YOUR SHOULDER. I’m definitely not saying that. What I am saying is that if you have to have a traumatic injury you should dislocate your shoulder. I’m not sure what kind of situation you’d be in where you could decide this sort of injury over that kind of injury. No one wants to have a traumatic injury, of course, but if there’s a situation where someone has a gun to your head or something and says, “Which traumatic injury do you want to have?” you should definitely tell them you want to dislocate your shoulder.

BRIEF NO. 31

Ohiopyle Falls
Project
Waypoints—Scenic Overlooks
Location
Ohiopyle State Park, PA
Subject
Ohiopyle Falls
Ohiopyle Falls

While the Monogahela, Mound Builders, were the first known group of people66These small stone mounds were used as burial sites by the Monongahela. to inhabit the Ohiopyle area​, the name Ohiopyle is actually derived from the Lenape​ (Delaware Indian) phrase ahi opihəle ​which​ translates to ‘it turns very white​.’ This is thought to refer to the foaming waters at the base of the falls and not to what appears to be stacked or piled stones that are the cause of all the boiling whiteness. It should be made clear that these cataracts are on the Youghiogheny River, known locally as the Yawk, and not the Ohio River. This potentially confusing naming convention dictates that we ask you to consult your map or mapping service for precise location information before beginning a journey to take in the view of these falls.

BRIEF NO. 30

Allosaurus via Lean-to
Project
Primitive Shelters
Location
The woods NE of Scappoose, Oregon
Subject
Found Shelter vs./X Portal: What If
Allosaurus via Lean-to

Lean-tos are creatively named small shelters built by leaning smaller sticks in an organized fashion against a larger more stable stick, such as a tree, or against one another in either the teepee or log cabin build format. They can be built in a variety of locations with the availability of construction resources the only limiting factor. Lean-tos have been found deep in the woods far off trail and so close to civilization that you can easily make out Robin Thicke in the air. Not strictly limited to a woodsman’s shelter these sometime small and uncomfortable structures can beguile the uninitiated. What is the motivation behind their construction? Escape from the elements, a place to rest, a meditative sanctuary, or maybe the architect-builder had nothing better to do while in the woods with their pre-adolescent children than to express an atavistic urge for shelter?

Recently while on a bike ride in the woods I passed one of these transient domiciles and I had a thought that held my attention: Why couldn’t this stack of sticks be something other than a shabby place to hide from the night?”- KVH

BRIEF NO. 29

Lyle Ruterbories, Glacier National Park Ranger
Project
National Parks
Location
Kintla Lake, Glacier National Park
Subject
Hazing Bears & Bullhorns vs. Rubber Bullets
Lyle Ruterbories, Glacier National Park Ranger

You have a half-built tent pole in your hand and a tumescent tent flapping at your feet. You are in small remote, primitive campground at the end of a 14-mile, one hour-long fire road through which you passed Big Prairie and Round Prairie and along which you followed the North Fork Flathead River. The road dead-ends at an alpine lake surrounded by mountains and forest. You are pitching a tent on the edge of that very same lake in the middle of those very same mountains and forests. The afternoon was  sunny, hot, dusty, lazy, etc., and but now it’s windy and considerably cooler, darker and foreboding. Currently canoers and kayakers are expediently retreating from the now choppy lake in search of, it would appear, proper headwear and moorings. Meanwhile the other campers appear to be collecting, securing and batoning-down myriad miniature dogs, children, laundry and nylon DWR-coated whatnots. You reckon you have five maybe ten minutes before it begins to rain or hail or whatever it does this high-up and this close to the real North, when Lyle,1an old guy in a Forest Service get-up, walks up, introduces himself and his role in relationship to the campground, and delivers a PSA-type announcement about a Naughty Bear and the bullhorn he gave Linda77Linda and Tom are from Evantston, Wyoming. As a child Linda wanted nothing more than to visit Glacier National park. Though her father, a Beekeeper by trade, promised Linda he would take her to Glacier one day, that day never came. Eventually, as an adult, Linda made it to Glacier—and it was everything she imagined it to be. Linda and her husband Tom have been the Kintla Lake Campground hosts for the last ten years. and Tom.

In 22 years I've never had a bear problem with food but lately a little Black Bear has been coming around. This morning it treed right here in camp. I just wanted to let you know that I gave a bullhorn-type siren deal to the Campground Hosts, Linda and Tom. So if sometime tomorrow morning maybe even before you're up about and you hear an air-raid siren, don't be alarmed, it's just a Black Bear in camp. What I'd like to do is put rubber bullets in my shotgun and shoot a few rounds at the bear's feet and educate it that way but that's not allowed anymore. So I reckon I will try hazing it this way instead.”- Lyle Ruterbories

 

From the National Park Service

 

“At 93 years old, Glacier National Park Ranger Lyle Ruterbories is contemplating retirement from his seasonal position at Kintla Lake Campground, but isn’t ready to make it official just yet. Ruterbories has worked as the  Kintla Lake Campground seasonal park ranger for the past 20 years and prior to that he was a volunteer campground host with his late wife Marge Ruterbories since the late 1980s. Kintla Lake Campground is the most remote frontcountry campground in Glacier National Park. Located in the northwest section of the park known as the North Fork, only a few miles from the Canadian border, visitors often come to Kintla Lake seeking solitude and recreational opportunities such as fishing or canoeing.Each week Ruterbories travels the rough and bumpy Inside North Fork Road from Polebridge to Kintla carrying food, water, and propane to the remote Kintla Ranger Station where there is no electricity, running water, or telephone available. The park ranger at Kintla Lake Campground must be skilled at rustic living, able to live and work independently, and possess a wide-range of skills to accommodate various resource and visitor needs. Daily duties include managing campground facilities, collecting fees, educating visitors on resource and park history topics, and conducting trail or lake patrol as time allows.”

BRIEF NO. 28

Water Interface Experimentation (WIE)
Project
Motels & Hotels (Temporary Lodging)
Location
Las Vegas, Nevada
Subject
Aquatic Corndoggin pre WIE
Water Interface Experimentation (WIE)

We are on the roof top in the newly non-renovated combination tennis court and pool area—accessible from the South Tower on the 5th floor and from the North Tower on the 7th floor—of the Plaza Hotel and Casino. The PH&C is located on Main Street in Old Town Las Vegas and is adjacent to Fremont Street, the second most famous street in Las Vegas after the Las Vegas Strip. Fremont Street is nicknamed Glitter Gulch on account of all the street’s abundance of neon signs like the cowboy Vegas Vic.

 

We are on our way to the Grand Canyon.

 

We have done the research and the results are clear, hotel pools are responsible for 67% of all pool-related injuries. We took into account Olympic-size public pools, kidney-shaped backyard pools, above ground doughboys, and even those stationary lap pools built for the senseless. The unsupervised coliseum-like setting leads to a level of oneupmanship unrivaled by other pool types. Home pools cause a fair amount of damage to be sure but what we discovered is that hotel pools provide a potent combination of public space and the freedom from familiar surroundings that 8 times out of 10 lead to water interface experimentation. And it is this uncommon usage that leads to most injuries. In cases where injuries occur legal and illegal substances were at play 83% of time.  Do we suggest avoiding hotel pools? Are we recommending that you stick with typical water interface usage? Of course not.

BRIEF NO. 27

OSOs & UOSOs e.g., Mt. Oberlin
Project
Waypoints—Scenic Overlook
Location
Glacier National Park, Montana
Subject
Mt. Oberlin USO
OSOs & UOSOs e.g., Mt. Oberlin

Official Scenic Overlooks (OSOs), as in those which our State and/or Federal government fund, build and maintain, effectively represent a place or “waypoint” from which something of significance88Something of Significance: Typically we’re talking about a natural wonder/feature which when paired with some amount of historical or geological or topographical or cultural context is interesting and therefore significant. Or, something so big and so obviously pretty in a typical, nearly-platonic and/or universal sense, it’s significant for simply existing. can be observed. OSOs exist in National Parks and State Parks, on Scenic Byways, Highways and on various rural roads throughout America. They’re called Scenic Overlooks, Lookouts, Observation Points, Overlooks, Vista Points, etc. Sometimes they’re nothing but a gravel turnout. Sometimes they’re a paved parking lot with parking spots and a gazebo-like structure for shade and to picnic under. Sometimes on a pedestal of sorts or built into a low stone wall there is historical plaque, or a map, or a diagram with information about a geological formation or the existence once, in the valley below, of an Indian Trade Route. Apparently, the only standard feature-function or common denominator among OSOs (FDA recommended vantages) is that they serve to encourage us (travelers) to stop what we’re doing for a minute, and observe something of significance, i.e. something Pretty & Important.

Hey buddy, quit speeding down Going-To-The-Sun Road and check out this really big mountain we're calling Mt Oberlin. It's pretty cool it's an 8,180 foot mountain located northwest of Logan Pass in the Lewis Range in Glacier National Park. Just below it's summit, water and melting snow spill into a 492 foot waterfall called Bird Woman Falls. Anyway, you should stop.”- YJ

While Un-Official Scenic Overlooks (UOSOs) like a sudden break in the trees on a switchback half way up a mountain trail, or the top of a double-overhead boulder on the side of desert fire road, lack signage, bureaucratic validation and amenities of the concrete kind, their existence and function, while sometimes temporal and impermanent, is no less important, relevant and valid. In fact, because USOs are a found and/or user-generated situation, they can be more personal, more memorable, more rapture-producing, more conducive to nature-inspired epiphany, etc. And you get to write your own plaque.

 

In either case OSOs and UOSOs are an opportunity to stop, observe and consider significant (remarkable & contextualized) examples of the natural world.

BRIEF NO. 26

Louisiana Custom Cars
Project
Waypoints – Gas Stations
Location
Ft. Drum, FL
Subject
Gas Stations
Louisiana Custom Cars

I just love the swamp and I love custom cars. Hopefully one day I can open up a custom car shop in Louisiana. I'm working on a pickup truck, I had a Nissan Maxima import tuner, I also had a Cadillac Seville low-rider, and hopefully one of these days I'll get me something old.”- Kenneth Aaron

Seen and met at the Ft. Drum Service Plaza99Mile marker 184 Florida Turnpike, main line.

 

BRIEF NO. 25

Archaeologizing, Pt. II
Project
American Archaeology
Location
Paradox Valley
Subject
Pre-trip Planning
Archaeologizing, Pt. II

From: William Gardner
Date: Monday, August 19, 2013
Subject: Archaeologizing
To: daniel wakefield pasley <[email protected]>

 

Hello Daniel

 

Great to hear from you. I hope all is well and I hope you guys are having a good summer.

 

In regards to transport, is Sunday the 3rd a solid arrival date or is it possible to arrive Saturday the 2nd? I only ask as we were thinking of pushing out from Denver on Saturday and then get a good full day tour of the valley / project area on Sunday. No worries if Sunday is the earliest you can arrive as we can make other arrangements. For example, one possible option is for you to fly directly into and out of Grand Junction, Colorado. There are a few dirt road options out of the project area that can have you in Grand Junction in little less than 2 hours.

 

Of course this is coming from my father who has worked in northwest Colorado for decades now and as such he is a bit of a salty dog when it comes to these things – the other day he and I were checking out a site in Delta, Colorado, he was like “hey lets go check out Paradox, I know a back road that will have us there in an hour” – we arrived four hours later and in the dark. The more I think about it, my father may not be the best barometer of travel time, although he has a billion different paths memorized, speed of travel is entirely dependent upon the amount of coffee he has consumed and the excitement associated with whatever story he is reminiscing about. But to be honest, even though it has been a while for me, I do think it is a pretty quick trip from where we will camp up to Grand Junction. This would also work well in regards to your shorter stay as we could very easily pick you up and drop you off directly at the airport – which will probably be a lot more convenient than trying to catch a bus or renting a car – also possibly a bit more cost effective.

 

In regards to your shorter stay, that is totally cool. The first 2/3 days will be more varied anyways, so you will get a nice sample of everything. I will recommend 3 days instead of 2, because Monday the 4th will be kind of a wash – we have to drive into Delta, Co to meet with the BLM people – first time project meet and greet thing. Typically these things are more fun in Mongolia as there is generally vodka involved – probably won’t be so lucky here. However, it will be good for you to come along and meet these guys as well. I just found out that because of the ‘protected’ status of archaeological sites, the BLM will ask you to send them all your ‘field’ write-ups for clearance before publishing (all they want to make sure is that you are not publishing site location information). I do realize that this is a bit of “big brother is watching”, but it is typical protocol and it will also be a lot easier/faster of a process if they get a chance to meet you in person and realize what you/yonder journal is all about.

Alright good buddy, I better run but I will talk to you later.

 

Take it easy,
Will

 

P.S. Even fried zucchini? Fried stuff’s goooood.

BRIEF NO. 24

Archaeologizing, Pt. I
Project
American Archaeology
Location
Paradox Valley
Subject
Pre-trip planning
Archaeologizing, Pt. I
Photograph by Daniel Wakefield Pasley.

From: William Gardner
Date: Wednesday, August 14, 2013
Subject: Archaeologizing
To: daniel wakefield pasley <[email protected]>

 

Hello Daniel

 

I hope all is well. Things are moving along nicely in regards to the Paradox project as we have gotten pretty firm dates from our South African colleagues as well as money – so baring any personal injury we are pretty much 100% a go.

 

As it stands right now we are all looking to arrive in Denver on Friday November 1, rest there (maybe) at my uncle’s and/or grandparent’s house for the day (mainly to let our foreigners battle through jet lag). Strike out for paradox early Saturday – begin work in honest on Sunday Nov. 3rd and work until the next Sunday (the 10th) at which point we head back to Denver and catch a flight to our respective destinations on Monday the 11th (the goal is to get 7 days of work in). Main research goals are to 1) survey / test a topography contingent survey methodology that is aimed at better understanding how people and archaeologist move across a landscape with extreme topography 2) map in a small village site that Xander (our South African colleague) may want to excavate in the coming years 3) excavate a small test unit in order to collect material that can be c-14 dated from a site my dad found.

 

Tentatively speaking, the crew will consist of my father (an archaeologist at a small community college in Wyoming), Andrew Blandshard who is a kiwi archaeologist for the New Zealand Department of Conservation, Andrew Antonites who is a South African archaeologist and professor at the University of Pretoria, my wife, my Mongolian colleague Jargalan Burentogtokh, you (and whom ever you wish to bring), and me.

 

With that being said, if this works out for you, how will you be traveling to the project area? If you wish to fly into Denver and meet up with us there we can make arrangements to have space for you in our caravan out to Paradox. Also how many people will be accompanying you? We don’t care but we do want to make sure we have enough food for you all. Oh yeah, food in the field camp is on us – well as long as you don’t have any crazy expensive diet restrictions (if that’s the case your on our won – sorry).

 

Also we do hope to mountain bike a bit while we are there. Most of us are out of shape, but it’s definitely worth bringing a bike if you can.

 

Super pumped to have you guys come along on this.

 

Take it easy,
Will

BRIEF NO. 23

Mather Point
Project
Waypoints – Scenic Overlooks
Location
South Rim, Grand Canyon, AZ
Subject
Mather Point Scenic Overlook
Mather Point

Weather in the WEATHER IN THE Grand Canyon1010The Grand Canyon is one of Seven Natural Wonders of the World; 1) Grand Canyon 2) Great Barrier Reef 3) Harbor of Rio de Janeiro 4) Mount Everest 5) Aurora 6) Paricutin Volcano 7) Victoria Falls. varies according to elevation. The forested rim is high enough to receive winter snowfall, while along the Colorado River path of the inner gorge temperatures are similar to those found in Tucson and other low elevation Arizona desert locations. Conditions in the Grand Canyon region are generally dry with substantial precipitation occurring twice annually. These follow seasonal pattern shifts in winter (when Pacific storms usually deliver widespread, moderate rain and high-elevation snow to the region from the west) and in late summer (due to North American Monsoons), which deliver waves of moisture from the southeast, causing dramatic localized thunderstorms fueled by high daytime temperatures. Average annual precipitation on the South Rim is less than 16 inches (35 cm), with an average of 60 inches (132 cm) of snow.

BRIEF NO. 22

Sarah Plummer Lemmon & Matt Hall
Project:
Mt. Lemmon
Location
Santa Catalina Mountains, SE Arizona
Subject
Sarah Plummer Lemmon & Matt Hall on Mt. Lemmon
Sarah Plummer Lemmon & Matt Hall

Sara Plummer Lemmon (b. 1836, d. 1923) was an amateur librarian, nurse and self-trained botanist. After marrying her husband (also a botanist), Civil War veteran John Lemmon, she sold her library in Santa Barbara, CA and traveled to Arizona to honeymoon with John. While documenting and painting plants in the Santa Catalina Mountains, Sara and John (with the help of local E. O. Stratton) scaled the tallest peak in the range, at which point they promptly named it after Sara by giving it the name she took from John, ergo the mountain, which mountain lies just outside the town of Tucson, Arizona, was and is called Mount Lemmon1111It’s name in the language of the native Tohono O’odham is Babad Doʼag.. Before returning home to California, Sara managed to discover and catalog for the first time a variety of species native to the mountain and surrounding areas.

 

Now a paved road leads up one side of the mountain to the Mount Lemmon Skycenter1212Operated by the University of Arizona’s science program, the observatory offers various learning opportunities and workshops to the public in addition to its higher education and research functions., a 4×4 track leads up the other, and running from top-to-bottom-bottom-to-top is a network of world class singletrack; Aspen Draw, Green Mountain, Bug Springs and Molino Basin—which singletrack when strung together and ridden in succession is called The Lemmon Drop.

 

Featured: Matt Hall in the middle of Bug Springs in the midst of one of the coldest winters on record.

BRIEF NO. 21

Kangaroo Lake and Fran
Project
Swimming Holes
Location
Callahan, CA
Subject
Swimming Hole Recon
Kangaroo Lake and Fran

While in the pursuit of provisions and local swimming hole intel/kowledge deep in the Mythical State of Jefferson, we (Greg Johnson, David Marchi, Moi Medina and Daniel Wakefield Pasley) visited the Callahan Emporium1313A Bar & quasi-Grocery occupying a building originally built in 1858 to house, incidentally/apparently, the first Wells Fargo in the area., where we met Fran, the establishment’s owner/operator. After a few drinks and some lite chit-chat we started asking her about local Swimming Holes, a somewhat touchy subject in a water-rich rural area famous for it’s recent anti-federalist separatism tendencies, Gold Rush past (and present), and illegal/hidden/dangerous marijuana operations. The locals are suspicious to the point of xenophobia. However Fran, who was as nice and welcoming as homemade pie, openly confirmed that Kangaroo Lake (our immediate next stop) was in fact an excellent Swimming Hole, “that’s where you hop back to heaven.” She introduced us to her her dog who she keeps in an office in the back, showed us a large gold nugget that was legally and locally prospected out of one of the area’s many amazing rivers2  and we discussed a genuine Miner’s Canary Cage she kept hanging on the paw of a stuffed bear mounted to the wall behind the counter of her bar.

I know all sorts of swimming holes around here, places with waterfalls that fall into clear blue holes, but all the best ones are on private land—and no they're not growing weed, they're just regular ranchers. I'm sworn to secrecy. Nobody wants the word to get out because before you'd know it there'd be 80,000 people trespassing on their land. And nobody wants 80,000 strangers in their hole.”- Fran

 

Yonder Beta: Callahan Emporium / 12511 California 3, Callahan, CA 96014 / 530-467-3395

BRIEF NO. 20

Minor Religions of the Mt. Shasta Region
Project
Swimming Holes
Location
Kangaroo Lake, CA
Subject
Mt. Shasta's Spiritual Significance
Minor Religions of the Mt. Shasta Region

Around a campfire at Kangaroo Lake with Mt. Shasta’s white peak dominating the horizon miles to the east1414A Swimming Hole guide to Kangaroo Lake is forthcoming., David Marchi, owner-operator of Crow’s Feet Commons in Bend, OR, and a native of Mt. Shasta, CA, explains a few details on the religions based upon legend regarding the mountain.1515Before providing this in depth account, please note that David has just finished a 235+ mile bicycle ride (A forthcoming Brovet, to be precise) and consumed a baker’s dozen of cold beers accompanied by handful of wild mushrooms.  What follows is a direct transcript of his elucidation.

 

THE LEMURIANS ARE DESCENDANTS FROM THE LOST LAND OF LEMURIA. There was Pangaea1616Before the seven continents we know today had their own identities, the landmass of Earth was all stuck together., and after it broke up part of it went missing— according to those around here that’s the lost continent of Lemuria. The Lemurians are people that have descended from Japan who live inside Mt. Shasta. They use their ability to produce powerful, inaudible harmonics to dig tunnels through the mountain. From time to time the Lemurians come out of the mountain when a lenticular cloud forms1717 Many pictures of Mt. Shasta show a big lenticular cloud over the mountain. Usually they’re created by super high winds, it’s a vortexual cloud, and they look like big hats or a tall stack of pancakes. around the peak. They come out and do whatever they do, maybe grab a couple of Animal-Style burgers at the Redding In N Out?

Including the Lemurians, there are 9 unique religions based on the mountain. ”

There’re also the Yoctavians who produce powerful harmonics, but with bells and instruments unlike the Lemurians who only use the power of their minds. The Lemurians are small and have a bubble on their forehead, created by the cosmic power of their brains. The Yoctavians are another people that live on the mountain; they’re seven feet tall and wear long white flowing robes. They’re the bellmakers, they have the harmonics but in a different way.

That’s the hoofy-foofy stuff really, but there’s also a Christian cult or religion kind of like Mormonism, in terms of development. There was a guy named John W. Ballard from Illinois. He was on the mountain around 9000 feet, dehydrated, it was like 1910, and he found a spring and met someone who said he was St. Germain. So St. Germain gave him golden scrolls—similar to Joseph Smith of Mormonism—that contained info on the coming of Christ. He went back to Illinois and started the St. Germain I AM foundation. People come back every August and pilgrimage to the site. They have a seven million dollar ampitheater they use for one weekend a year. Nobody in the religion wears black or brown or red; it’s all simple, light colors. You see people all over town in August wearing nothing but white. They have something like 50,000 members.

 


 

Editor’s Note: At this point David and the rest of the Yonder Swimming Hole Expeditionary Force lapses into silence due in equal parts to the profound (and confusing) revelations about the mountain, its people, and the overwhelming waves of consciousness resulting from the potent mix of exhaustion, alcohol, and psilocybin.

 

Editor’s Note II: Of the nine religions mentioned, YJ can confirm the existence of a number: the Lemurian Connection, the I AM/St. Germain Foundation, The Summit Lighthouse, Church Universal and Triumphant, Kryon and the Hearts Center—in addition to the number of Native American belief systems from the area. If you have any further information on legends or beliefs based on Mt. Shasta, please contact us.

BRIEF NO. 19

The Fist Bump
Project
Swimming Holes
Location
Washougal River (Coordinates TBD)
Subject
Contemporary Congratulatory Gestures
The Fist Bump
Words by Kyle von Hoetzendorff. Photograph by Daniel Wakefield Pasley.

IF YOU DO A GIANT GAINER OFF A 40′ CLIFF INTO A BUBBLING BLUE POOL the size of a hot tub surrounded by jagged rocks and come up smiling then you deserve some acknowledgement. We may not be best friends or even know each other if we met on the street—we may hate each other. Still, I feel the need to acknowledge the doing of something that, when done wrong, has such obviously dire consequences. I too have a death drive albeit one that may be forever stuck in second gear.

 

Choosing the right form of acknowledgement is paramount. The potential types of praise are wide ranging, existing on a continuum with the demure and potentially antagonistic head nod on one end to the wild exuberance of a spastic high five on the other. Factors of intimacy, feat, and surroundings must be accounted for; miscalculation can derail the energy of the event with the potential to send those involved into a spiral of shame. Fortunately there is a gesture that stands on solid middle ground, the fist bump1818Also known as fist pound, bro fist, spudding, fo’knucks Bust, pound dogg, props, or respect. Fist Bump, Wikipedia.

 

Pugilistic in essence, the fist bump honestly conveys goodwill while giving each actor the ability to maintain a cool emotional distance. It is a safe play. Once used strictly by boxers to test each others strength and will, this versatile and easily-learned gesture has since been co-opted by mass culture; sports stars of all stripes can be seen spudding, celebrities, grand parents, social workers, dog walkers, truck drivers, rodeo clowns, and airline pilots can all be seen giving props, even President Obama can be seen regularly giving respect to notable dignitaries. Fist bumps have acquired universal status, sign language slang of the first order, utilized alone and in gestures such as dap1919“Dap is a form of handshake that has recently become popular in western cultures” Dap Greeting,Wikipedia. A video on the subject, The Dap Project, is a video documentary ca. 2006 from High School of Commerce, Springfield, MA..

 

If you haven’t yet try it out, knock your own knuckles together, feel the connection. Experiment with your friends and family to find out when a fist bump is appropriate for you, and then branch out to neighbors and colleagues. The risks are low and there will come a time where the fist bump is assimilated into your communication resources, alongside those other venerable hand signs: the wave, handshake, high-five, thumbs up, middle finger, devil horns, and peace sign.

 

As for the gainer guy, after our fist bump we sipped on beers while he explained that he normally does his gainers with a chest mounted GoPro. I commented that I bet the footage was pretty amazing, and his buddy who was wearing bone-dry cutoff jeans reflected that the footage was indeed a, “mother fucker to see.” I wasn’t able to find the chest mount footage, but I am pretty sure the guy on the left in this video is the same guy that I shared a fist bump with, and I have to say this is a mother fucker watch.

BRIEF NO. 18

The Ideal Shelter
Project
Primitive Shelters
Location
Woods outside Scappoose, OR
Subject
A-Frame/Double Lean-To
The Ideal Shelter
Words and photograph by Daniel Wakefield Pasley.

THE A-FRAME SHELTER (OR DOUBLE LEAN-TO) is particularly useful given it’s ease of construction and low material requirements: two shorter branches2020Finding one branch with a y-notch is preferable, as it avoids the need for cord and lashing—just drop the second branch into the notch. and one longer branch form the frame of your shelter, while the walls are simple stick-and-leaf constructions—the more leaves, the more insulation. In addition, the shelter is well-suited to the human shape: narrow near the feet and wider at the head, double lean-tos make efficient use of space, making it easier to find a suitable location to place the shelter. The small volume of the shelter also makes insulation more efficient.

BRIEF NO. 17

Headwaters of the Sacramento River
Project
Non-Swimming Holes
Location
Mt. Shasta, CA
Subject
Headwaters of the Sacramento River
Headwaters of the Sacramento River
Words and photograph by Daniel Wakefield Pasley.

THE SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA’S largest river212130,000 cfs annually, finds its origins in Northern California between the Coastal and Klamath mountain ranges to the west, and the Cascade and Sierra Nevada ranges to the east. More importantly and more specifically the Sacramento springs into existence from a wet hole in a City Park at the base of a stratovolcano in the town of Mt. Shasta. 

 

There is a playground, a footpath, four picnic areas, a gazebo and a handful of reservable public buildings in Mt. Shasta City Park2222“The land, which ultimately became the Mt. Shasta City Park, was once part of the hunting grounds of the Wintun, Maidu, and Okwanuchu Indian tribes and was first crossed by explorers around 1841.” Mt. Shasta Parks . Footbridges and steps have been built around the headwaters/spring/wet hole to accommodate the hundreds of locals as well as travelers—the City Park is just off Interstate 5—who daily frequent the park to drink, visit, splash and fill various jars/bottles/cups/mugs/buckets as close to the source as possible.

 

What water doesn’t get consumed on the spot eventually travels 400 miles to the Suisan Bay, an arm of the San Francisco Bay.

BRIEF NO. 16

Buckle Bunnies
Project
RODEO
Location
Pendleton, OR
Subject
Pendleton Roundup - 100th Anniversary
Buckle Bunnies
Photographs by Daniel Wakefield Pasley.

The girls that wear their Rodeo-Boyfriend’s belt buckles, as well as the groupies or Pro-Hos that ‘cruise’ the Rodeo grounds looking for riders, are called Buckle Bunnies.

They don't even know your face, but they can find you because they're good at it.”- Ben Londo, Professional Saddle Bronc Rider

BRIEF NO. 15

DFKWA: Baldface Creek – Part I
Project
DFKWA
Location
Baldface Creek & Watershed
Subject
Baldface Reconnoiter
DFKWA: Baldface Creek – Part I
Words and photograph by Daniel Wakefield Pasley.

THERE IS NO BETA OR GUIDE OR INFORMATION IN REGARDS TO HIKING AND/OR FLOATING BALDFACE CREEK, a tributary of the North Fork Smith River2323Despite running its course in California, the river depends on tributaries throughout the Oregon Siskiyou Mountains. The river contains not a single dam along its entire length. Wikipedia Zach Collier, a River Outfitter with 20-plus years experience paddling and floating all of the many known and typical-but-still-remarkable rivers in the Mythical State of Jefferson (where residents, it’s said, are likely packing both a pistol & a crystal), as well as many of the not so known and not-so-typical-but-still-remarkable rivers, has, in the last ten years, attempted Baldface on three separate occasions, two different ways, and was turned back each time because of snow. The creek is only floatable in the winter when it rains heavily and where in the higher elevations it snows heavily. The unmarked trail down and into the creek branches off an unimproved forest road twelve miles in, the last four of which lie past a permanently closed POC (Port Orford Cedar) gate2424The US Forest Service maintains a large number of gates—some temporary and some permanent—in order to limit access and slow the spread of Port Orford Cedar root disease, which can kill trees of any size and age. More information.. In the winter and into the spring the road is covered in snowpack two or three feet deep, with drifts on the north slope and in the shade as deep as four or five feet.

 

For reasons related to American River’s naming of Baldface to the MER (Most Endangered Rivers) list, and for documentation in regards to the Kalmiopsis Wilderness Area Expansion Efforts, we needed to reconnoiter the creek. For tactical reasons we decided to hike, not float, Baldface. A date in early March was was chosen, weather was watched, flow was monitored, and three days before our departure, the date was moved to mid March. Again, weather was watched and flow was monitored, and again the date was pushed back due to unfavorable weather conditions and limited contingencies regarding possible high-flow and gorging-out. Once again, weather was watched, flow was monitored and but this time inflatable pack-rafts were organized, which rafts would prove invaluable if not absolutely and utterly necessary.

BRIEF NO. 14

Mule Deer Radio Collaring
Project
Population Biologist
Location
Bridger Valley, WY
Subject
Jeff Short
Mule Deer Radio Collaring
Interview and photograph by Daniel Wakefield Pasley.

“I WORK WITH LARGE ungulates2525Ungulates can more simply be described as hoofed mammals.: large game species like antelope, mule deer, elk and moose. Basically, I go out into the field and collect information via various means, like radio collars or visual observation. I take that information back to the office for data analysis and statistical work, and then I put reports together. Those reports help us make decisions about what’s best for the wildlife in terms of population management, and they help determine sustainble and repsonsiblie hunter harvests. The research also assists us with habitat protection and landscape scale issues2626Landscape-scale conservation is a holistic approach to wilderness conservation that takes into account local economic and social considerations.”—Jeff Short

BRIEF NO. 13

The Disappearance of Everett Ruess
Project
Nowhere
Location
Canyonlands NP, UT
Subject
Thaddeus "Chico" Farrell
The Disappearance of Everett Ruess

At night next to the campfire, at various times during day apropos of nothing except maybe a change in the wind, or when stopped for a moment on an ancient packhorse path for water and to watch eagles watch rabbits, Thaddeus talks about Everett Ruess: a writer, artist and explorer last seen at the age of 20 leading a burro into Davis Gulch2727See page 23 for access information (NPS PDF) in 1934. Ruess, whose body has never officially been Discovered2828A body found in 2009 at first appeared to be Ruess’, but later examination of dental records proved otherwise—Wikipedia, and whose death has never been satisfactorily explained, has over the years become a Western myth and wildman legend. This in part because of his pre-Instagram handle, Nemo, which handle he carved into the walls of various caves in the middle of Utah’s otherworldly nowhere. In Latin “nemo” means no one or nobody. It’s believed by some that Everett was referencing Homer's Odyssey2929After the Trojan War, Odysseus sets off for home, crossing the land of the Cyclops (the one-eyed giants). One of them, Polyphemus, takes Odysseus and his crew captive. Odysseus begs Polyphemus to let him and his crew go. When Polyphemus asks his name, Odysseus replies, “Nemo”. when he chose it: fitting, as while Ruess was apparently seeking to lose himself and become nobody in a metaphoric sense, he literally disappeared in the Canyons of the Escalante—one of the least accessible and most un-mapped area in the contiguous United States (especially at the time).

BRIEF NO. 12

Dall Sheep Kebabs
Project
Arctic Red River Outfitters
Location
MacKenzie River Area, N.W.T., Canada
Subject
Jason Hairston
Dall Sheep Kebabs
Photograph by Daniel Wakefield Pasley.

JASON HAIRSTON’S INSTRUCTIONS FOR DALL SHEEP KEBABS ARE SIMPLE AND STRAIGHTFORWARD:

 

  1. Find a wild Dall Sheep and murder it.
  2. Hike it off the mountain in orange trash bags.
  3. Butcher it on flat rock in the shallows of a glacial river, like so.
  4. Stack several uneven, rough-cut slabs of meat onto a willow stick you whittled to a point with the knife you carry on your belt. No vegetables.
  5. Season them with Montreal Salt and/or Top Ramen flavor packets, or nothing at all.
  6. Place them over a fire you made using gathered sticks and the trash in your pack.
  7. Barely cook them.
  8. Eat them off the stick.

 

Unfortunately, he fails to describe what you’ve had to accomplish before completing these steps.

BRIEF NO. 11

The Ideal Woodsman Knife
Subject
Primitive Shelters
Location
Woods outside Scappoose, OR
Subject
Bushcraft
The Ideal Woodsman Knife

The idea woodsman [footnote highlighttext=”knife” optionalimage=””]For this purpose, we may recommend knives the Helle Norway Temagami.[/footnote]has a 4″ blade and 4″ handle for an overall 8″ length. The blade has a Scandinavian grind as this allows for easy sharpening in the field without the use of a jig to get the sharpening angle correct. Ideally the blade is also full tang with a riveted wood or plastic handle. A partial tang or rat tail tang can break when really using the knife hard. The handle should be smooth with no finger grips or other anatomical grooves and form fitting gimmick-shapes like you see in many modern knives. These sorts of handles are uncomfortable and will cause blisters when doing any real woodcarving or bushcraft3030“Bushcraft is about surviving and thriving in the natural environment, and the acquisition of ancient skills and knowledge to do so. Bushcraft skills include; firecraft, tracking, hunting, fishing, shelter building, the use of tools such as knives and axes, foraging, hand-carving wood, container construction from natural materials, rope and twine-making, and many others.” Wikipedia.”

 

Shaun Deller, Wilderness Survival Instructor, Wild Edible Plants Specialist and Primitive Shelter Sportsman.

BRIEF NO. 10

DFKWA: Rough and Ready Creek – Part I
Project
DFKWA
Location
Rough and Ready Creek North Fork
Subject
Rough and ready recon
DFKWA: Rough and Ready Creek – Part I

The 1964 Wilderness Act set aside nine million acres of National Forest3131Find National Forests listed by state here: http://www.fs.fed.us/recreation/map/state_list.shtml land in the original National Wilderness Preservation System. As of 2012, 107.5 million acres of land have been protected as Wilderness—about 2.8% of the lower continental United States.

In the middle of the Mythical State of Jefferson, near the border of California and Oregon, in the Siskiyou Mountains near the town of Cave Junction, Oregon (pop. 1,883.), lies the Kalmiopsis.”- YJ

There are almost 200,000 unprotected acres of wilderness contiguous with the 179,000 acre Congressionally-designated Kalmiopsis Wilderness, and thousands more acres of nearby roadless area. The de facto Wilderness is watershed to the Illinois, Chetco and North Fork Smith rivers, all designated as Wild and Scenic Rivers, plus five streams that are eligible to become Wild and Scenic Rivers (Silver, Indigo, Josephine/Canyon, Rough and Ready, and Baldface Creeks).

 

All five streams in the DFKWA (De Facto Kalmiopsis Wilderness) are threatened by mining, two in particular—Rough and Ready, and Baldface—are also threatened by Port-Orford-Cedar Root Disease, a destructive & devastating fungus spread through earth movement in construction, road maintenance and use, e.g., mining, logging, and general overuse/misuse of any kind.

 

In partnership with Zach Collier & NWRC (Northwest Rafting Company) Yonder Journal will explore, interview and document the DFKWA3232We will document these explorations throughout 2013 with regular briefs, and conclude the year with a large study.; it’s streams, it’s rocky cut-banks, it’s surrounding hills and steep mountains, it’s thick and pungent forests, it’s indigenous and carnivorous plants, it’s sharp winters and quick summers, it’s porous soils, the environmentalists and otherwise ordinary citizens working to expand the Kalmiopsis, the hikers and backpackers and boaters who use and or frequent the area, the locals and local businesses, Forest Service employees, Rangers, trail & restoration work, and the miners; their interests, operations and opinions.

 

Our aim is to produce a report with which we endeavor to aid in the expansion of the Kalmiopsis.

BRIEF NO. 9

Rowdy Water
Project
Charlie Fowler Power Tour
Location
Dolores River, CO
Subject
Steve "Doom" Fassbinder
Rowdy Water

In a good year (mean annual flow = 1240cfs) the rapids on the Dolores River between Cahone, Colorado and Moab, Utah can be successfully navigated by inflatable pack-raft—most of the rapids are class II, with a few notable class IV. In a bad year (50 CFS), and with a 29er, backpacks and panniers lashed to the bow, rafting, as in actually floating, can be a challenge. Over the course of four days, we paddled three different sections of the river, electing to mountain bike beside it for vast stretches because the river was either too shallow3333At times, especially as we made our way through Western Colorado, we dragged, pushed and pulled (more than paddled) our packed rafts through less than eighteen inches of water. An eight mile section might take us several hours and force us to repeatedly get into and out of our rafts to navigate around larger rocks and past the wider sections where the flow was diminished and the river more shallow., too rocky, or simply not moving fast enough.

 

While this campaign was primarily a rock climbing trip in honor of Charlie Flower—Steve Doom Fastbinder and Thaddeus Chico Ferrell would climb ten towers in fourteen days; Monster Woman, Washer Tower, South Six Shooter, Zuse, Moses, Predator, etc.—we spent a considerable amount of time mountain biking and rafting over the course of our circuit around the La Sal Mountains.

BRIEF NO. 8

Killing a Mountain Caribou
Project
Arctic Red River Outfitters
Location
Mackenzie Mountains, N.W.T., Canada
Subject
Jason Hairston
Killing a Mountain Caribou

Mountain Hunting is the only sport which requires three days of travel, several hotels, two commercial flights, one semi-commercial twin otter flight, three 4-wheeler rides, the rushed near forced consumption of a chunky bowl of stew made with meat of indeterminate origin and a helicopter flight over the watersheds of the Arctic Red and Cranswick Rivers in the Northern MacKenzie Mountains of the Northwest Territories operated by a pilot prone, rumor has it, to seizures, not to mention weeks if not months of preparation in regards to kit and fitness, as well as some serious cash and a large duffle bag should you be returning to America with a dead animal(s), just to show-up at the start line.

 

In the rain on a ridge more than eight miles from a gravel landing strip and after an athletic six hour stalk, Jason, two days after killing a fully-tipped classic looking Dall's Sheep Ram3434Ovis dalli is a species of sheep native to northwestern North America, ranging from white to slate brown in color and having curved yellowish brown horns., sights-in before whacking a Mountain Caribou3535e.g Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Donner, Blitzen and Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer with “trash everywhere and junk going out in all different directions.”

BRIEF NO. 7

Boredom, Slingshots, and Prairie Dogs
PROJECT
Rodeo
Location
Black Diamond, Alberta
Subject
Ben Londo
Boredom, Slingshots, and Prairie Dogs

It’s 7:45 AM in four bedroom basement in rural Alberta. The TV, which TV is always on, is playing through its perpetual loop of rodeo highlights, live rodeo, and various Will Ferrell movies, Semi-Pro and Anchor Man clear favorites. On an ironing board next to a billiards table sits a steaming iron, a crisp still-warm pair of wranglers, and a pink button-up cowboy shirt with SKOAL embroidered down one sleeve in overly large letters. On a wooden coffee table, copies of PSN, American Cowboy, Club, Juggs and Spank lie next to bags of ice, the cloth kind with a screw top, and nearly-empty beer bottles filled with spit.

 

Ben Londo and his traveling buddies (Blaze, Ryan, Luke and Roy) are bored. In between calls and texts to friends regarding the quality and personality of the horses they’re up-on over the next couple three days, horses with names like Scary Larry, Power Supply, Fearless Warrior, Working News, Sun Devil, etc., they are shooting Praire Dogs, often at point blank range, with sling shots and compound bows.

BRIEF NO. 6

We Would Like to Visit
Project
The Mythical State of Jefferson Permanent
Location
Siskiyou County, CA
Subject
Black Bear Ranch
We Would Like to Visit

Reproduced below are two emails exchanged with Black Bear Ranch3636The Black Bear Ranch website, which hosted among other things information and a questionnaire for potential visitors/residents, now appears to be offline. during the planning of The Mythical State of Jefferson Permanent. Photograph by Emiliano Granado.

 

From: [email protected]
Date: Fri, Jun 21, 2013 at 12:01 AM
Subject: We Would Like To Visit
To: Black Bear [email protected]

Hi, below I’ve filled out your questionnaire.

 

1) What is your name, where are you from and where do you currently reside? 

My name is Daniel Wakefield Pasley, I was born (February 19th, 1972) and raised in Annapolis, Maryland. I moved to Los Angeles when I was fifteen, I lived in LA or the LA area for 10 years before moving to Portland, Oregon where i’ve been for the last 14 years.

 

On July 18th me and 12 friends are riding (bicycles) 250 miles in one go from just outside yreka to happy camp to grants pass to ashland. The whole trip will take us 36 hours or thereabouts. We will ride slow, we will stop to swim and visit with some friends along the way. We will take photographs. We will immerse ourselves in the area and the expereince.

 

2) How did you find out about the ranch?

One of us lives in Hayfork, California, he’s known about BBR going way back. While researching roads and the area through which we wanted to ride we learned were going to ride right past BBR, and so naturally we immediately thought to see if a visit was possible.

BRIEF NO. 5

Black Bear Ranch
Project
The Mythical State of Jefferson Permanent
Location
Somes Bar, CA
Subject
Mile 102, Malcolm Terence
Black Bear Ranch

THIRTEEN OR FOURTEEN OR WHATEVER HOURS INTO THE FIRST DAY, on the other side of the first appalling tall climb—at the top of which climb, FTR, some of us visited Black Bear Ranch Commune which it as it turns out  was a disappoint on several levels, like for example hygiene—while riding along the California (Cal) Salmon River in the last hour or so of daylight, we randomly-but-for-seriously-serendipitously came upon a venerable MSOJ-looking man out for a walk with his daughter and her Labrador. Malcom Terence we come to find out was also a co-founder of the aforementioned Black Bear Ranch— no comment regarding our hygiene observations. After a dusky riverside chat, Malcom suggested to Cole that he walk back to his truck parked just down the river a bit in order that he could give Cole a copy of a  book about the early days of the commune he happened to have in the back seat of his rig. Malcolm doesn’t visit BBR any more. According to him, it’s not quite the same as when it was founded with funds now primarily coming from the entertainment business and a large LSD deal. But he still lives in the area just down the mountain, alongside the river.

Thirty of us survived that first intense Siskiyou County winter and were swollen with rural bravado. We invited up all the extended family from the Bay Area and beyond. One day Richard Marley, who I always thought of as the founder of Black Bear, called us together to plan for the expected onslaught of visitors. What preparations would be needed? Where would folks stay. That kind of thing. We talked passionately, if inconclusively, around the circle for an hour or more and finally agreed that things would take care of themselves. No planning necessary. People used to think that way in the ’60s.”- Malcom Terence

 

 

BRIEF NO. 4

Origins
Project
The Mythical State of Jefferson Permanent
Location
Siskiyou County, CA
Subject
Mile 5, Scott Valley
Origins
Mike's saying this valley dates back to the 1800s for mining and ranching. He says Etna is over to the right, which is east or south or southeast, whatever. Apparently Etna was a big gold mining center. We’re passing our first cattle sign of the ride; apparently we need to be on the look out for steer and cows and cattle shaped stuff for the the next 20 miles.”- Transcribed from a recorded audio note dictated by Kyle Von Hoetzendorff at 8:14 AM on 16 July 2013 during the start of Brovet #4 Mythical State of Jefferson Permanent.

In fact, the Scott Valley3737Which is notably different than Scott’s Valley, a city in Santa Cruz County., as well as the federally designated Wild & Scenic Scott River, was named for John W. Scott, a prospector who in 1850 was the first to discover gold in the area. Unlike many other regions mined during the California Gold Rush, the Scott River continued to be prospected well into the 1900s via river dredging, with operations continuing in some areas until legal changes forced their closure in 19553838A detailed description of a 19th-century dredging operation in Callahan is available here under “Extensive Mining.”. However, it’s economic importance had been established years earlier, with trapping operations so successful in the area (now home to the towns of Fort Jones, Etna and Greenview) that the valley’s original western name was Beaver Valley. Stephen Meek, who hunted and trapped all over the West for the Hudson Bay Company, thought Scott Valley was the best trapping area he ever visited/worked.

BRIEF NO. 3

The Heart of the Klamath
Project
The Mythical State of Jefferson Permenant
Location
Happy Camp, CA
Subject
Mile 107, Chief Tawonka
The Heart of the Klamath
We were free until we stopped fighting, now no one has freedom.”- Chief Tawonka

HAPPY CAMP, CALIFORNIA (POPULATION 1190) followed a typical Siskiyou County Township timeline: (1) Big Bang, (2) Ice Age, (3) Big Foot, (4)  Native Americans3939E.g. the Karuk who, as it turns out, continue to use Happy Camp as their Tribal Headquarters., (5) Mountain Men, Fur Trappers, and Frontiersmen, (6) Gold Rush, (7) Timber-based economy, (8) self-identifying with the Mythical State of Jefferson, and (9) a m-a-j-o-r population decrease in the early 1990’s coinciding, incidentally, with increased Timber Regulations. Aside from it’s outstanding Recreative Reputation (R&R), Happy Camp is notable for producing a Canadian Football League All-Star Quarterback, selling a recent $5,000,000.00 Scratcher Lotto Ticket4040The ticket was purchased at Parry’s Market, an apparently-anonymous Facebook account for the town broke the story. and for housing the main offices of the Klamath National Forest’s Happy Camp/Oak Knoll Ranger Districts.

 

In spite of the fiberglass statue guarding the Forest Lodge parking lot located at 63712 California 96, Chief Tawonka never existed. Which means “We were free until we stopped fighting, now no one has freedom” was either plagiarized and thereby stolen from a different-but-presumably-real-this-time-indian or written by short sweaty southern white man in an office without windows in the basement of the Cheaper Cigarettes Headquarters somewhere in the deep south. The now defunct Cheaper Cigarettes made 82 (or 72, depending on your source) identical statues.

BRIEF NO. 2

Skid Town Bicycles
Project
Brovet: The Mythical State of Jefferson
Location
Cecilville, CA
Subject
Klunker Bikes
Skid Town Bicycles
Photo thanks to Mike Cherney.

On the origin of Skid Town Bicycles

 My name is Keven Krueger, I live in Callahan, CA. I’m a stonemason by trade but a few years back I started putting bikes together. I had no bicycle knowledge outside of knowing how to turn a nut, but I wanted to make bikes that could mob down hills without falling apart or breaking down.”- Keven Krueger - Callahan, CA

BRIEF NO. 1

Low Stress Cattle Management
Project
Zero to Two
Location
Lonetree, WY
Subject
Weaning
Low Stress Cattle Management

“THE CONCEPT AND PRACTICE OF LOW STRESS CATTLE MANAGEMENT is an important component of the Black Dog Livestock Education4141“Through the livestock industry’s range of demands in the 21st century, a diversified, stress-free education has been developed to meet this variety of needs not only for the livestock but also the stock handlers.”—The Black Dogweaning method. The livestock learn to move from stress when the handler understands how to give them relief through the concepts of low stress cattle management. The work in this field is becoming more widely used thanks to the work and teaching of Bud Williams, Tom Nofsinger, Temple Grandin, Sean and Evonne Barrett, and David Hart. Low stress management is beneficial to the cattle, the cattleman, quality of meat, production cost and the pocket book. This type of management specifically, improves cattle response to vaccinations, reduces injuries and diseases during handling and transport, creates better temperament in cattle, better gains, higher pregnancy rates, all with fewer input requirements in shorter time. It is acknowledged that a cows temperament has huge implications on how she performs as a breeder, thus heifer calves who are weaned using the Black Dog method grow up to be more docile and manageable cows.

 

The essence of Low Stress Cattle Management involves understanding cattle behavior and the impact the handlers physical position has on the efficiency and effective control of livestock movement. By understanding the connection between the handler’s movement and the animal’s behavior the stock handling becomes more predictable. The Black Dog method is built using this understanding.”

Marissa Taylor , Ranch Manager at Lonetree Ranch.

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ABOUT

YONDER JOURNAL IS THE EXPLORATION OF AMERICAN FRONTIERS AND WESTERN PRINCIPLES. We are Cultural Anthropologists and Sportsmen compelled into the Wilderness to explore, document and publish a lasting and meaningful record of our experiences there. Through a collection of Studies, Briefs and Guides we endeavor to understand and relate those people, places and pursuits the purview of Yonder.

MASTHEAD

Daniel Wakefield Pasley
Founder, Editor
Emiliano Granado
Founder, Editor
Kyle von Hoetzendorff
Editor, Writer
Kevin Edward Brown
Publisher